Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach

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Synopsis[edit]

German composer, teacher, and church musician

  • Born March 8, 1714 in Weimar, Germany
  • Leipzig, studied with J. S. Bach
  • 1735 Frankfurt an der Oder, taught keyboard
  • 1740 Berlin, appointed to the service of Prince Frederick II
  • 1753 Berlin, Wrote the 'Essay on the True Art of Playing Keyboard Instruments'
  • 1767 Hamburg, took Telemann's position as music director of the principal churches
  • 1768 Hamburg, responsible for the teaching of music at the Hamburg Lateinschule
  • Died on December 14, 1788 in Hamburg, Germany

1730-1788 Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach composed over 1000 works from songs to symphonies. The 'Nachlass-Verzeichnis' is the earliest catalog of his works. Although he primarily composed for keyboard, he did write some for organ.He composed most of his organ sonatas and two organ concertos for the Princess Anna Amalia. The organ sonatas are notably written without pedal because the Princess could not play with pedals. His other works include pedal. His style is notable for its freedom and variety. For example, in his Preludio in D Major H. 107, he freely switches back and forth from Grave to Presto. The texture also changes between the two markings as well. The Grave has a thick chordal texture while the presto is light with thin texture.

For details, see the Wikipedia article on Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach.

List of Organ Works[edit]

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Background and General Perspectives on Performing C. P. E. Bach Organ Works[edit]

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Registration and Organs[edit]

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See the footnote in the "Notes" section at the bottom of the page[1]

Fingering and Pedaling[edit]

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Articulation and Phrasing[edit]

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Ornamentation[edit]

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Tempo and Meter[edit]

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Scores and Editions[edit]

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Recordings[edit]

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Free Online[edit]

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach: Sonate Nr. 4 a-moll: 1. Allegro, performed by Professor Johannes Geffert

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Other Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. This footnote was entered in the "Registration and Organs" section

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