Flor Peeters

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Synopsis[edit]

Belgian composer, organist and teacher

  • 1903 born in Tielen, Belgium, just over the border from the Netherlands.
  • 1919 began study at the Lemmens Institute.
  • 1923 became a professor at the Lemmens Institute.
  • 1923 he also became chief organist at St. Rumbold's Cathedral in Mechelen, a position he held for most of the rest of his life.
  • 1931–48 became professor of organ at the Ghent Conservatory.
  • 1935–48 professor of organ and composition at the Tilburg Conservatory in the Netherlands.
  • 1948 to 1968 organ professor at the Antwerp Conservatory.
  • 1952-1968 director of the Antwerp Conservatory.
  • 1986 died in Mechelen, Belgium.

Peters wrote an enormous number of chorale preludes, around 322 in total. He is also well-known for his pedagogical method, Ars Organi. He was a prolific composer, and was well-known also as a performer and pedagogue, making frequent tours to perform and to conduct master classes. Some of his most famous works are listed below.

For details, see the Wikipedia article on Flor Peeters.

List of Organ Works[edit]

Click to sort by opus number, title, or year of composition or publication
Opus Title Year
Op. 20 Variaties en finale on a Flemish lied 1929
Op. 28 Toccata, fuga en hymne op Ave maris stella 1933
Op. 52a Concert Piece 1944
Op. 55 35 Miniatures for Organ 1947
Op. 66 Lied Symphony 1948
Op. 95 Thirty Short Preludes on Well-Known Hymns 1960
Op. 100 Hymn Preludes for the Liturgical Year 1966
Op. ?? Title year

Background and General Perspectives on Performing These Organ Works[edit]

From Wikipedia:

"Peeters studied Renaissance music, particularly of the school of Flemish polyphony. This style was also absorbed into his music."

"Peeters showed an interest in twentieth century tonal composition techniques such as polyrhythms and polytonality."

From Oxford Music Online:

"highly individual style...His fluent melodic line is influenced by Gregorian chant, Flemish Renaissance polyphony and often by Flemish folk themes."

"Peeters’s works are characterized by a preference for classical forms...great skill in handling miniature form."

"He frequently experimented with polyrhythm, polytonality and complex contrapuntal devices"

"Typical of the longer works is the contrast of vigorous, contrapuntal, rhythmic outer sections with subdued, contemplative material for the second subject where the influence of plainchant and folksong is discernible in the melodic shape."

Registration and Organs[edit]

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See the footnote in the "Notes" section at the bottom of the page[1]

Fingering and Pedaling[edit]

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Articulation and Phrasing[edit]

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Ornamentation[edit]

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Tempo and Meter[edit]

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Scores and Editions[edit]

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Recordings[edit]

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Free Online[edit]

Lied Symphony, Opus 66: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AjLcnH_cOAw

Concert Piece, Opus 52a: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CBuImoRKzGo

Pay to Listen[edit]

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Other Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. This footnote was entered in the "Registration and Organs" section

This space is for automatic insertion of footnotes. To enter a footnote from anywhere in the article, start by typing the tag <ref> and then enter the text, and type the tag </ref> to end the footnote. The footnote will then appear in this "Notes" section automatically.