Herbert Howells

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Synopsis[edit]

English organist, composer, and teacher

  • Born in Lydney, England on October 17, 1892
  • He studied with Brewer at Cloucester Cathedral.
  • 1912 He won an open scholarship to the Royal Conservatory of Music.
  • At the Conservatory he studied with Stanford for composition.
  • He was influenced by Parry and admired his philosophy.
  • He became sub-organist at Salisbury Cathedral but had to quit in 1917 for health reasons.
  • 1917-1980He became a teacher at the Royal Conservatory of Music.
  • 1936-1962 he was director of music at St Paul's Girls' School in Hammersmith.
  • 1950 he was appointed King Edward VII Professor of Music at London University.
  • 1941-45 deputised for Robin Orr as organist of St. John's College in Cambridge
  • Died in London, England on February 23, 1983

Howells was not considered famous after his early years, but after his death his works were rediscovered for their depth and range. He uses Gregorian chant as influence. His early music has romantic tendencies with chromaticisms. His later style is quartal/quintal, almost late-romantic: pleasant, and easy to listen to. He uses new harmonic language, but it is not so strange as Messaien's. His most famous sonata is the second. He is known for "creating an ecclesiastical style for the 20th c." (Oxford Music).

For details, see the Wikipedia article on Herbert Howells.

List of Organ Works[edit]

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Opus Title Year
Op. 1 Organ Sonata 1911
Op. Phantasy Ground Bass 1915
Op. 32 3 psalm-Preludes set 1 1915-16
Op. 17 Rhapsody no. 1 1915
Op. 17 Rhapsody no. 2 1918
Op. 17 Rhapsody no. 3 1918
Op. Sonata no. 2 1932
Op. 3 Psalm-Preludes set 2 1938-39
Op. Fugue, Chorale and Epilogue 1939
Op. Master Tallis's Testament 1940
Op. Preludio Sine nomine 1940
Op. Saraband for the Morning of Easter 1940
Op. Paean 1940
Op. Intrata (no. 2) 1941
Op. Saraband In Modo Elegiaco II 1945
Op. Siciliano for a High Ceremony 1952
Op. Prelude De profundis 1958
Op. Rhapsody no. 4 1958
Op. 2 Pieces 1959
Op. Dalby's Fancy, Dalby's Toccata, A Flourish for a Bidding 1969
Op. Partita 1971-2
Op. Epilogue 1971
Op. St Louis comes to Clifton 1977
Op. 6 Short pieces 1987 Post.
Op. 2 Slow Airs 1987 Post.
Op. Miniatures 1993 Post.

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Notes[edit]

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