Herr Christ, der ein'ge Gottes-Sohn (Herr Gott, nun sei gepreiset) (BWV 601)

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from Das Orgelbüchlein by Johann Sebastian Bach

Background[edit]

Bach provided titles of two texts for this chorale. "The first of these, an Advent hymn, is the likely basis for the prelude. The second, actually a table grace, bears no liturgical relationship to Advent or Christmas."[1]

it is important to familiarize yourself with the original chorale tune. http://www.bach-cantatas.com/Pic-CM/HerrChristeinig04.jpg, along with the words of chorale to understand the mood, emotion, and meaning behind the text. The chorale melody is found in the soprano line.

English translation of the Advent hymn:

Lord Christ, the only Son of God,
the eternal Father,
arisen from his heart,
as it is written:
He is the Morning Star,
He sends forth His splendor,
Brighter than any other stars.
(Elisabeth Cruciger)[2]

English translation of the grace hymn:

Lord God, now be glorified,
We give joyous thanks
that You show us grace
and have given us food and drink,
so that we might know Your mercy,
and to strengthen our faith
that You are our God.
(anonymous)[3]

Registration and Organs[edit]

This prelude calls for a full Principle Chorus Registration (including Mixture) in the manual, with Reeds found in the pedal (also known as organo pleno)
Great: 8', 4', 2' Principles , + Mixture
Pedal: 16' 8' Reeds (+ 4' Reed if not too loud or 4' Principle)


See the footnote in the "Notes" section at the bottom of the page [4]

Fingering and Pedaling[edit]

The same rhythmic motif with thirds and an octave are found in the pedal part, and fragments of the motif are found in the other voices. Play each pedal note with all toes, alternating the left and right foot.

It is helpful to practice the pedal line alone, thinking about it as a pedal exercise.

The first part of the motif can be played left, right, left toes (always keeping in mind where the right toe will be heading next). This is helpful because of the motion of the right foot moves most often in stepwise motion.

The second part of the motive is an octave. Remembering to keep your knees together will help you practice, learn, and play the octave with confidence.

To articulate the octave, a break (or rest) should be placed between the two notes.

Articulation and Phrasing[edit]

The Clark/Peterson edition provides articulation of the recurring figure found in the pedal line and inner voices.

Ornamentation[edit]

No ornamentation is indicated in this organ chorale.

Tempo and Meter[edit]

The accompanying figure has its best effect at a moderate tempo.[5]

Scores and Editions[edit]

Historical Organ Techniques and Repertoire, Volume 2, J.S. Bach—Basic Organ Works (ed. Quentin Faulkner)

Completely fingered in early fingering styles. Includes helpful information on the original chorales and performing the works.

J. S. Bach: Orgelbuchlein (ed. Robert Clark and John David Peterson)

Includes helpful information on the original chorales and performing the works.

[1]

Website (organmusicdownloads.com) where you can instantly access, purchase and download score BWV 601 for $1.49.

IMSLP, Bach Gesellschaft edition

Free download

Recordings[edit]

Free Online[edit]

James Kibbie, 1724-30 Trost organ, Stadtkirche, Waltershausen, Germany,

using Gedackt 8', Principal 4', Octava 2', and Mixtura IV in the Brustwerk; Groß Principal 16', Violon-Bass 16', Octaven-Bass 8', Super Octava 4', and Trompetten-Bass 8' in the Pedal.

http://www.contrebombarde.com/concerthall/music/3782

http://www.organmusicdownloads.com/index.php?route=product/product&product_id=48

Listen to sample audio file for BWV 601 music for instant access, purchase, download, and print yourself

Pay to Listen[edit]

Replace this text with any specific information on online recordings that are available for a fee

Other Resources[edit]

Replace this text with any information on other resources pertinent to performing these works

Notes[edit]

  1. Johann Sebastian Bach: Orgelbuchlein. Ed. Robert Clark and John David Peterson. (St. Louis, MO: Concordia, 1984), 34.
  2. Johann Sebastian Bach: Orgelbuchlein. Ed. Robert Clark and John David Peterson. (St. Louis, MO: Concordia, 1984), 34.
  3. Johann Sebastian Bach: Orgelbuchlein. Ed. Robert Clark and John David Peterson. (St. Louis, MO: Concordia, 1984), 34.
  4. This footnote was entered in the "Registration and Organs" article.
  5. Johann Sebastian Bach: Orgelbuchlein. Ed. Robert Clark and John David Peterson. (St. Louis, MO: Concordia, 1984), 34.
This space is for automatic insertion of footnotes. To enter a footnote from anywhere in the article, start by typing the tag <ref> and then enter the text, and type the tag </ref> to end the footnote. The footnote will then appear in this "Notes" section automatically.