Johannes Brahms

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Synopsis[edit]

Biography

The prestigious German composer Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) had a very humble introduction to the musical world. His first lessons were from his father; later, he studied with Eduard Marxen. As a youth, Brahms made money playing in taverns. Eventually, Brahms was heard by Liszt and Schumann. Both liked his style, but Brahms never became close to Liszt. Schumann and his wife, Clara, however, became fast friends and staunch supporters. In fact, Schumann was responsible for the publication of Brahms' three piano sonatas. Brahms traveled extensively over the next few years, settling in Vienna in 1878.

Although he wrote only fifteen pieces for organ, they indicate Brahms' vast knowledge of the instrument. His organ compositions are deeply rooted in traditional forms. Labeled conservative by some, they possess artistic sensitivity few composers could hope to achieve. The Eleven Chorale Preludes, his most important contribution to organ literature, were composed in the last year of his life. Religiously based, they are unique in their beautiful reflection of the original hymn texts.

Points of Interest

Brahms received an honorary doctorate from Breslau University. Was offered another in 1876 from Cambridge University. He declined, owing to the distance. In 1886 he was made a member of the Knight of the Prussian "Orde pour le merité" (order for merit), and also elected a member of the Berlin Academy of Arts. Brahms is often dubbed the third "B"–Bach, Beethoven, and Brahms.

For details, see the Johannes Brahms article on Wikipedia.

List of Organ Works[edit]

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Opus Title Year
WoO 7 Chorale Prelude and Fugue on O Traurigkeit, o Herzeleid, in A Minor 1858, 1873
WoO 8 Fugue in A♭ Minor 1856
WoO 9 Prelude and Fugue in A Minor 1856
WoO 10 Prelude and Fugue in G Minor 1857
Op. 122 11 Chorale Preludes 1896

Background and General Perspectives on Performing Brahms Organ Works[edit]

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Registration and Organs[edit]

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See the footnote in the "Notes" section at the bottom of the page[1]

Fingering and Pedaling[edit]

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Articulation and Phrasing[edit]

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Ornamentation[edit]

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Tempo and Meter[edit]

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Scores and Editions[edit]

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Recordings[edit]

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Free Online[edit]

Johannes Brahms: Es ist ein Ros entsprungen, performed by Sebastian Kuechler-Blessing is playing the Hauptwerk organ of Joerg Glebe

Mein Jesu, Der Du Mich - Op. 122, No. 1, performed by Bernard Lagacé Performing on the Wolff Organ At the Eighth Church of Christ, Scientist, New York City

Pay to Listen[edit]

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Other Resources[edit]

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Notes[edit]

  1. This footnote was entered in the "Registration and Organs" section

This space is for automatic insertion of footnotes. To enter a footnote from anywhere in the article, start by typing the tag <ref> and then enter the text, and type the tag </ref> to end the footnote. The footnote will then appear in this "Notes" section automatically.