Charles Ives

From Organ Playing Wiki
Jump to navigationJump to search

Synopsis[edit]

American composer, organist, and teacher

  • Born in Danbury, CT on Oct. 20, 1874
  • Was taught harmony and counterpoint from his musical father
  • 1888- 1902 became the youngest salaried organist in CT, and worked for various churches since then.
  • 1893 moved to New Haven, CT
  • 1893-4 became the organist at St. Thomas's Episcopal Church in New Haven.
  • 1894 became organist at Center Church on the Green and entered Yale where he studied with Horatio Parker
  • 1895 Studied with Dudley Buck
  • 1898 moved to New York after Graduating from Yale. Became an insurance salesman, which is how he supported himself for the rest of his life.
  • 1898-1900 organist in Bloomfield, New Jersey
  • 1900 organist at Central Presbyterian Church in New York
  • 1902 "resigned as a nice organist and gave up music." (quote from Ives himself)
  • 1908 married Harmony Twichell
  • 1927 stopped composing new works and dedicated himself solely to revision of his previous works.
  • Died in New York, NY on May 19, 1954

His most famous organ work is Variation on "America" (1891-92). He has written anthems and sacred songs for church services. Many of his works were lost because when he left his last position as organist he left some of his music there and it was thrown away. In regard to his style, "Many of the distinctive features of Ives's mature music stem from his experience as an organist, including his penchant for improvisation, virtuosic demands on performers, orchestration with layering or juxtaposition of contrasting timbres (akin to contrasting ranks of pipes on the organ's different keyboards), spatial effects (based on alternating Great and swell keyboards), and frequent use of pedal points, Fugal textures, and hymn tune elaborations, all characteristics of the organ repertoire." (Oxford Music online).

For details, see the as listed in Wikipedia article Charles Ives.

List of Organ Works[edit]

Click to sort by opus number, title, or year of composition or publication
Opus Title Year
Op. 131 Adeste Fideles in the style of an organ Prelude 1898
Op. 134 Canzonetta in F 1893-4
Op. 135 Fugue in C minor 1898
Op. 136 Fugue in Eb 1898
Op. 137 Interludes for Hymns 1898-1901
Op. 140 Variations on "America" 1891-2 rev. in 1949

Background and General Perspectives on Performing These Organ Works[edit]

Replace this text with any general perspectives that do not fit under the categories listed below. (For comments on a specific piece or genre, use the list of pieces above to navigate to that page.)

Registration and Organs[edit]

Replace this text with information on registration and organs that might be applicable to the whole set of pieces

See the footnote in the "Notes" section at the bottom of the page[1]

Fingering and Pedaling[edit]

Replace this text with information on fingering and pedaling that might be applicable to the whole set of pieces

Articulation and Phrasing[edit]

Replace this text with information on articulation and phrasing that might be applicable to the whole set of pieces

Ornamentation[edit]

Replace this text with information on ornamentation that might be applicable to the whole set of pieces

Tempo and Meter[edit]

Replace this text with information on tempo and meter that might be applicable to the whole set of pieces

Scores and Editions[edit]

Replace this text with information on scores and editions that might be applicable to the whole set of pieces

Recordings[edit]

Replace this text with information on recordings

Free Online[edit]

Pay to Listen[edit]

Replace this text with information on online recordings that are available for a fee

Other Resources[edit]

Replace this text with information on other resources that might be pertinent to performing these pieces

Notes[edit]

  1. This footnote was entered in the "Registration and Organs" section

This space is for automatic insertion of footnotes. To enter a footnote from anywhere in the article, start by typing the tag <ref> and then enter the text, and type the tag </ref> to end the footnote. The footnote will then appear in this "Notes" section automatically.